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    London, UK (26th Jan 2015): Monsoon Cup Malaysia, the final event of the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour, is to take place in its new home of Johor, the southernmost state of Malaysia, over 10th-14th February. In addition to being the grand finale of the Tour, the event will also see the 2014 ISAF Match Racing World Champion crowned. Much is at stake for Ian Williams and his GAC Pindar team. To date Williams has won the World Match Racing four times (in 2007-8 and 2011-12). If at the Monsoon Cup he can score a fifth World Championship victory, then he will surpass Australian Peter Gilmour’s record of wins (in 1990, 1997-8 and 2006) and will enter the history books as the person to have claimed the world title the most times in the Championship’s 27 year history. In 2013, Williams narrowly missed out on achieving the record when he finished runner-up, five points shy of US Virgin Island skipper Taylor Canfield and his US One team. For the present championship, Williams is in better shape. Once again the main threat is Canfield, but going into the Monsoon Cup the British match racing ace holds a six point advantage over his rival. Unfortunately in real terms this doesn’t represent much of a cushion: Williams still has to finish within a place of Canfield if he is to secure his fifth World Championship title. “We’re six points ahead of Taylor and last year we were ten behind, so it is the same sort of magnitude and whichever team progresses furthest will probably win, unless something unusual happens, like last year, when we ended up only one place ahead with the second place in the final,” says Williams. “For us, our approach is to try and win the regatta and if we do that we’ll be World Champions. He has more to think about trying to knock us out early.” Ian Williams and his GAC Pindar team are currently leading the Tour leaderboard with 94pts © Ian Roman / AWMRT Meanwhile Canfield is out to defend his World title. “While we worked hard to close the gap in the overall standings after Williams took a big lead in the beginning of the season, we are in a position to still take the title. It is our Championship to win and Ian's to lose. With the pressure on Williams, any mistakes will be costly as we only have to put one boat between us in the Monsoon Cup to win the AWMRT Championship.” A championship victory for Canfield will also be significant for his Kiwi tactician Rod Dawson as personally this will represent his fifth World title, having previously scored three with Peter Gilmour, and one with Canfield in 2013. Taylor Canfield of US One is aiming for his second World Championship at the season finale at the Monsoon Cup © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT Mathematically as it stands, any one of the top five crews on the leaderboard could win the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour. Click on image to enlarge matrix table © AWMRT Statistically however, for Australian Keith Swinton to clinch the title - he is currently lying in fifth place - he would need to win the event and Williams would need to finish in 11th place or worse, Canfield in 9th or worse, etc. 12 points adrift of Canfield at present, third-placed Mathieu Richard and his Lunajets crew are better placed to gun for the top spot, but this would require yet more stars to align: the Frenchman would have to win the Monsoon Cup, Williams to finish sixth or worse (unlikely as this would be his lowest Monsoon Cup result in five years) and would require a fourth or worse finish for Canfield, who, again, has not finished off the podium since Match Race Germany in June. Mathieu Richard (LunaJets) and team are looking to clinch their first World Championship title © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT The chances are even slimmer for the Stena Match Cup Sweden winning skipper, Bjorn Hansen, who lies in fourth place on the leaderboard going into the Monsoon Cup, a further seven points astern of Richard. More realistic is the prospect that any of the top five could reach the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour podium. Mathematically sixth-placed Phil Robertson and his WAKA Racing Team are in with a slim chance, even if they are 20 points adrift of it at present. However it should not be forgotten that it was the young Kiwi skipper who is the defending champion of the Monsoon Cup, following his victory in Kuala Terengganu in 2013. Sixth going into the Monsoon Cup that year, Robertson’s ended up elevating WAKA Racing to third overall in the championship. As Tour Director of the Alpari World Match Racing Tour Craig Mitchell observes: “The overall result still hangs in the balance with Williams holding a slight edge over Canfield and any of the top five still technically able to win. Qualifying will be all on from the outset as those results will decide who selects their opponent for the crucial Quarter Final knock-out stage. We've had some pretty big championship deciding showdowns in the Quarter Final in previous years and depending on where teams are placed in Qualifying I can see some fireworks happening again. Click on image to check out the latest Skipper infographics © AWMRT “The Monsoon Cup is going to be an intense event and with a new venue in Danga Bay, Johor teams will have curve balls coming in from all over the place. Add to that the inevitable mind games, it will add to a spectacular finale.” In addition to winning the World Championship title and the chance to enter the history books alongside the likes of Chris Dickson, Russell Coutts, Dean Barker, Peter Gilmour, Ed Baird, James Spithill and Ben Ainslie, also at stake is the prize money, both for the Tour as well as for the Monsoon Cup. From a prize purse of US$ 500,000 – the largest across the breadth of professional sailing – the World Champion and winner of the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour receives US$ 100,000, the second placed finisher US$ 80,000, with prize money on a diminishing scale to all eight Tour Card skippers. As if this were not pay day enough, there is also substantial prize money on offer for the Monsoon Cup itself with a prize purse of MYR 1,475,000 (US$ 412,760) up for grabs and with the winner receiving MYR 310,000 (US$ 86,750). Follow all the action on LIVE streaming from 10-14 February at www.wmrt.com

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    London, UK (16th Jan 2015): The World Match Racing Tour has had a successful title partnership with Alpari (UK) Limited since 2012, generating significant exposure for the brand. We were very sorry to hear the news today that Alpari has entered into insolvency, particularly for our friends and colleagues at the company who have been affected by the announcement. The World Match Racing Tour is continuing as scheduled, including the final event of the 2014 World Championship in Malaysia from 10-14 February. The Tour will shortly announce its 2015 calendar of events, including two new official stages. With over 250 sponsors involved across all Tour events worldwide, we have already received interest from potential global partners for the coming season.

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    London, UK (26th Jan 2015): Monsoon Cup Malaysia, the final event of the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour, is to take place in its new home of Johor, the southernmost state of Malaysia, over 10th-14th February. In addition to being the grand finale of the Tour, the event will also see the 2014 ISAF Match Racing World Champion crowned. Much is at stake for Ian Williams and his GAC Pindar team. To date Williams has won the World Match Racing four times (in 2007-8 and 2011-12). If at the Monsoon Cup he can score a fifth World Championship victory, then he will surpass Australian Peter Gilmour’s record of wins (in 1990, 1997-8 and 2006) and will enter the history books as the person to have claimed the world title the most times in the Championship’s 27 year history. In 2013, Williams narrowly missed out on achieving the record when he finished runner-up, five points shy of US Virgin Island skipper Taylor Canfield and his US One team. For the present championship, Williams is in better shape. Once again the main threat is Canfield, but going into the Monsoon Cup the British match racing ace holds a six point advantage over his rival. Unfortunately in real terms this doesn’t represent much of a cushion: Williams still has to finish within a place of Canfield if he is to secure his fifth World Championship title. “We’re six points ahead of Taylor and last year we were ten behind, so it is the same sort of magnitude and whichever team progresses furthest will probably win, unless something unusual happens, like last year, when we ended up only one place ahead with the second place in the final,” says Williams. “For us, our approach is to try and win the regatta and if we do that we’ll be World Champions. He has more to think about trying to knock us out early.” Ian Williams and his GAC Pindar team are currently leading the Tour leaderboard with 94pts © Ian Roman / AWMRT Meanwhile Canfield is out to defend his World title. “While we worked hard to close the gap in the overall standings after Williams took a big lead in the beginning of the season, we are in a position to still take the title. It is our Championship to win and Ian's to lose. With the pressure on Williams, any mistakes will be costly as we only have to put one boat between us in the Monsoon Cup to win the AWMRT Championship.” A championship victory for Canfield will also be significant for his Kiwi tactician Rod Dawson as personally this will represent his fifth World title, having previously scored three with Peter Gilmour, and one with Canfield in 2013. Taylor Canfield of US One is aiming for his second World Championship at the season finale at the Monsoon Cup © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT Mathematically as it stands, any one of the top five crews on the leaderboard could win the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour. Click on image to enlarge matrix table © AWMRT Statistically however, for Australian Keith Swinton to clinch the title - he is currently lying in fifth place - he would need to win the event and Williams would need to finish in 11th place or worse, Canfield in 9th or worse, etc. 12 points adrift of Canfield at present, third-placed Mathieu Richard and his Lunajets crew are better placed to gun for the top spot, but this would require yet more stars to align: the Frenchman would have to win the Monsoon Cup, Williams to finish sixth or worse (unlikely as this would be his lowest Monsoon Cup result in five years) and would require a fourth or worse finish for Canfield, who, again, has not finished off the podium since Match Race Germany in June. Mathieu Richard (LunaJets) and team are looking to clinch their first World Championship title © Robert Hajduk / AWMRT The chances are even slimmer for the Stena Match Cup Sweden winning skipper, Bjorn Hansen, who lies in fourth place on the leaderboard going into the Monsoon Cup, a further seven points astern of Richard. More realistic is the prospect that any of the top five could reach the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour podium. Mathematically sixth-placed Phil Robertson and his WAKA Racing Team are in with a slim chance, even if they are 20 points adrift of it at present. However it should not be forgotten that it was the young Kiwi skipper who is the defending champion of the Monsoon Cup, following his victory in Kuala Terengganu in 2013. Sixth going into the Monsoon Cup that year, Robertson’s ended up elevating WAKA Racing to third overall in the championship. As Tour Director of the Alpari World Match Racing Tour Craig Mitchell observes: “The overall result still hangs in the balance with Williams holding a slight edge over Canfield and any of the top five still technically able to win. Qualifying will be all on from the outset as those results will decide who selects their opponent for the crucial Quarter Final knock-out stage. We've had some pretty big championship deciding showdowns in the Quarter Final in previous years and depending on where teams are placed in Qualifying I can see some fireworks happening again. Click on image to check out the latest Skipper infographics © AWMRT “The Monsoon Cup is going to be an intense event and with a new venue in Danga Bay, Johor teams will have curve balls coming in from all over the place. Add to that the inevitable mind games, it will add to a spectacular finale.” In addition to winning the World Championship title and the chance to enter the history books alongside the likes of Chris Dickson, Russell Coutts, Dean Barker, Peter Gilmour, Ed Baird, James Spithill and Ben Ainslie, also at stake is the prize money, both for the Tour as well as for the Monsoon Cup. From a prize purse of US$ 500,000 – the largest across the breadth of professional sailing – the World Champion and winner of the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour receives US$ 100,000, the second placed finisher US$ 80,000, with prize money on a diminishing scale to all eight Tour Card skippers. As if this were not pay day enough, there is also substantial prize money on offer for the Monsoon Cup itself with a prize purse of MYR 1,475,000 (US$ 412,760) up for grabs and with the winner receiving MYR 310,000 (US$ 86,750). Follow all the action on LIVE streaming from 10-14 February at www.wmrt.com

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    London, UK (16th Jan 2015): The World Match Racing Tour has had a successful title partnership with Alpari (UK) Limited since 2012, generating significant exposure for the brand. We were very sorry to hear the news today that Alpari has entered into insolvency, particularly for our friends and colleagues at the company who have been affected by the announcement. The World Match Racing Tour is continuing as scheduled, including the final event of the 2014 World Championship in Malaysia from 10-14 February. The Tour will shortly announce its 2015 calendar of events, including two new official stages. With over 250 sponsors involved across all Tour events worldwide, we have already received interest from potential global partners for the coming season.

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    London, UK (7th Nov 2014): With some downtime now on the cards for Team Alpari FX, the boys are embarking on a new challenge for the hairiest month of the year…Movember. For the 30 days of November, men around the world are taking action by changing their appearance through the growth of a new moustache, and Team Alpari FX is on board for the prickly journey ahead. Movember is more than just an excuse to grow a fine piece of ‘moustachery’, it’s about sparking conversations while raising funds and awareness for prostate cancer, testicular cancer and men’s mental health. It’s about having fun and ‘doing good’, and at the same time an excuse to laugh at newly acquired facial hair (or lack of)! Movember is the leading global organisation committed to changing the face of men’s health and thanks to the support of more than four million participants worldwide, they have raised $580 million and funded 800 programs in 21 countries. A clean shave Skipper Keith Swinton and his fellow Australian Mo Bros – Ricky McGarvie, Ben Lamb, Tudur Owen and Ted Hackney – start their Mo-growing journey with a clean-shaven face. To show your support and find out more visit Team Alpari FX Movember and follow the team’s progress on Twitter @TeamAlpariFX

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    Hamilton, Bermuda (24th Oct 2014): For the first time since 2003, Bermuda has been struck by hurricane strength winds not once but twice in the last fortnight. Yet remarkably over this period the mid-Atlantic British Overseas Territory has managed to lay on not just this week’s Argo Group Gold Cup, but last week hosted the world’s top golfers at the PGA Grand Slam. Being on the track of north Atlantic hurricanes means that the islanders have had to adapt over the years and for example a stringent set of building regulations help minimise the inevitable carnage when 100+ mph winds strike. Thanks to efforts of the National Hurricane Centre in the USA, hurricanes are not only tracked but great effort goes into projecting their track. After devastating several Caribbean islands, it was known several days in advance that Tropical Storm Fay and last Friday’s Hurricane Gonzalo were likely to strike Bermuda, so anticipating Gonzalo the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club delayed the start of the Argo Group Gold Cup by a day. Trees were uprooted by the effects of Hurricane Gonzalo Once Gonzalo passed they held a meeting to assess their situation. “If we had 95% of the island without electricity, then we’d have had a problem,” admits event Chairman Brian Billings. In the event only half the island lost power, one damaged International One Design was replaced and the devastation at the airport was such that it was operational again within 24 hours. “After numerous phone calls, we said ‘yes, we’re on’,” says Billings. Hurricane Gonzalo was vicious. Leaving the Caribbean it was rated as a Category 2 hurricane (83-95 knots) but hitting warm open water it built to a Cat 4 (113-136 knots) before downgrading marginally to a Cat 3 just before hitting Bermuda. Argo Group Gold Cup Event Chairman Brian Billings According to Billings, Gonzalo’s slow pace made it a ‘long storm’ with winds already up to storm force by 0700 local time on Friday and still honking by 1100 the next day. “In between my barograph took a very slow spin down and it went down to 27.5 [931mB] and then there was a little bit of a horizontal line and then she slowly came back up again…” This was in stark contrast to Hurricane Emily which came and went within just four hours. Strangest was the eye of the hurricane, continues Billings: “It was huge – it took an hour to pass. It was flat calm, very eerie and very misty – it was kind of weird. Then all of a sudden – womp – the eye wall hit and it came in with a vengeance, like someone threw a bucket of iced water at you unexpectedly.” Damages caused by Hurricane Gonzalo When Gonzalo struck Billings says the most wind he saw was 130mph while he was at home, however this was at sea level and it was stronger on higher ground. Despite this the devastation caused was surprisingly slight. This was partly thanks to Tropical Storm Fay having swept through a week earlier with winds of 110+mph. “When Fay hit we hadn’t had any major wind storm for quite a while, so the branches were heavy and we had a very wet August so there was a lot of foliage all over the place and the trees were all laden with flowers and buds, which added extra weight to them,” Billings continues. “So Fay took out of a lot of trees, and the clean up was longer than it was for Gonzalo - the roads were blocked for almost two days. Without that there could have been a lot more damage and the infrastructure could have suffered much more when Gonzalo hit.” Damages caused by Hurricane Gonzalo Through sheer luck, the timing of the two storms could not have been better. Fay hit leaving just enough time for the golf course at Port Royal to be cleaned up ready for the PGA Grand Slam, despite vast tree damage. “You wouldn’t have known it had happened - they got the course in great shape real fast,” says Billings. “Bermuda is very resilient and has a capability and the attitude to bounce back. People just jump in and help neighbours and we have our Bermuda regiment which helps.” During hurricanes, usually as devastating as the wind is the storm surge, the massive volume of water blown along ahead of the system. However this did not affect Bermuda. Billings explains: “They were forecasting 35-45ft seas outside of the reef line on the South Shore, but there is the reef that slows it down, so we don’t get a storm surge from there. If it goes from the north then it can come into the Great Sound, then it comes into the Harbour and has no place to go. That happened during Emily.” According to Billings hurricanes strike Bermuda once every 10 years. So having two in the space of a week means statistically they should be free of them for some years to come. Good news for the Argo Group Gold Cup in years to come hopefully.

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    London, UK (14th Nov 2014): The discipline of Match Racing is considered the most combative and strategic form of sailing. With just two boats pit against each other on the race course in identical boats, match racing is about the pure skill of the skipper and the agile performance of his or her team. The ability to make quick decisions and outwit your opponent - every move counts. All rules decisions are made by on-water umpires selected by the International Sailing Federation (ISAF). This concept was developed by the match racing community and has been long used in the America’s Cup to provide instant decisions to the teams and avoid long protest hearings after racing. Think it’s an easy job? In a new series of ‘You’re the Umpire!’, we take a look at some of the difficult calls the umpires have to make. Would you make the same decisions? 2014 Dutch Match Cup  - Williams vs Hansen In this tense pre-start during Qualifying at the 2014 Dutch Match Cup, both Bjorn Hansen of Hansen Sailing Team and Ian Williams of GAC Pindar fight for position as the clock counts down to the start. In the final seconds before the start, Williams makes an arguably aggressive manoeuvre diving for a gap between Hansen and the committee boat resulting in a collision with both Hansen and the committee boat. Who was in the right and who was in the wrong? And what decision did the Umpires make? In the 4 minute pre-start, both teams fight for the upper hand crossing tacks and trying to move into the best position. Teamwork is key at this point to execute fast manoeuvres in the small pre-start area  Hansen (sailing boat 3) positions himself to leeward and in a right of way position over Williams (boat 5) to make it difficult for Williams to start close to the starting vessel Williams turns towards the start line. He has no right to room between Hansen and the starting vessel because under the rules he cannot call for room when approaching the line to start  The questions here are whether there is room for Williams to fit in the gap between Hansen and the committee boat. And if Hansen subsequently heads up and 'shuts the door’ on Williams, has Williams been given the opportunity to go somewhere other than into the rapidly closing gap. Hansen, as the [leeward] right of way boat, is obliged under rule 16 to give room to the other boat to keep clear as he changes course.  At this point the Umpires have a number of options they can take; Call 1: If there is room for Williams between Hansen and the committee boat, and Hansen simply ‘shuts the door’ without giving Williams any room to keep clear - Penalty to Hansen for breaking rule 16. Call 2: If there is room for Williams between Hansen and the committee boat, and Williams had the room to dip behind Hansen’s stern or tack out to the right of the committee boat as the gap closed but chose not to, then Penalty to Williams for not keeping clear of Hansen. Call 3: If there is no room for Williams no matter what Hansen’s actions then Penalty to Williams for not keeping clear. Call 4: If you give the penalty to Williams and decide he gained an advantage compared to where he would have ended up if he’d bailed out, then hand him a second 'umpire initiated’ Penalty. The Final Umpires Decision: The umpires decided that Williams was in the wrong and he received two penalties, one for not keeping clear of Hansen, and one for gaining an advantage through breaking a rule. Would you have made the same decision? Share your comments on our Facebook post here

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    London, UK - 14 May 2012: Several rule changes have been confirmed for the 2012 Alpari World Match Racing Tour, coming into effect at the first event of the season, Match Race Germany in Langenargen on May 23 – 28. The Racing Rules have been amended in order to continue the positioning of the Alpari World Match Racing Tour (AWMRT) as the most compelling, competitive and pioneering action on the water. Craig Mitchell, Alpari World Match Racing Tour, Tour Director, expects the alterations to have a positive effect on the Tour, as well as match racing in general: “Match racing has evolved to the point where we currently have a great set of rules, producing some fantastic sporting action, as we saw quite clearly in the 2011 series. “Nothing major has changed in the past few years and we are enthusiastic in our responsibility to keep developing the rules to challenge our world class athletes and create the best possible spectacle we can.”

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    Langenargen, Germany (9th June 2014): Downunder, where chief umpire Bill Edgerton comes from, there’s a children’s character called Blinky Bill, a laid-back cuddly cartoon Koala. But if the sailors on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour think they can pull the blinkers over their on-the-water officials, they’ve got another thing coming. Edgerton (known to some as Complicated Bill) and his colleagues are wise to their mischievous tricks. Most of the boats used on the Alpari World Match Race Tour are tiller-steered, but at Match Race Germany, the Bavaria 40 keelboat is equipped with a wheel. This offers the cheekier skippers a new opportunity to pull the wool over the eyes of the umpires. Just as professional footballers are prone to tripping over a blade of grass on the edge of the penalty box, sailors are not immune to similar forms of dyspraxia. Tight situations sometimes tempt sailors into the dark art of dissimulation. But Complicated Bill is on to them: “They're playing to the umpires! They're trying to gain an advantage, and it's a game between us and them. “They're always trying to show that they're doing what they need to stay out of trouble, and we're always looking to see that they're doing enough. So, they can exaggerate the drama of the situation and make it look as though it's more dramatic than it is in reality. But it's not as bad as a dive in football. “When you need to keep clear, you have to turn the boat, and if you're not close enough or not watching closely, they can slide their hands over the top of the wheel without actually turning it, saying, ‘Look, I'm going as hard as I can!’” Little beknown to the offending skipper, Edgerton is looking further down - below the waterline - for evidence of whether or not they’re really trying. “Actually if you're looking at the rudder you see there's no turning of the rudder whatsoever. It's up to us to try and satisfy ourselves if they are really doing everything they can, or if they're just playing a game.”news88.net http://www.europosud.ua http://motioncrisp.wordpress.comevakuator-servis.com/http://www.galid.com/

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    Langenargen, Germany (8th June 2014): Being a professional sailor isn’t just about being able to sail a boat fast, it’s about conducting yourself in a professional manner in every respect. It’s what you do off the water that counts too, such as negotiating with commercial partners who can help fund the costs of competing on a global circuit. French skipper Mathieu Richard has shown a useful knack of being able to sign a sponsor who can help his team perform on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour. Last year, despite lacking a Tour Card, Richard succeeded in finding a sponsor in GEFCO who helped him compete on a number of events as a Wild Card holder. Victory at the Korea Match Cup and some other great performances were sufficient to get him back into this year’s circuit as one of the eight Tour Card holders. “It's a great feeling to be back as a Tour Card holder, because the last time was in 2011. We managed to get a new sponsorship with LunaJets, so they are following us for this season. I'm very excited and very glad to be on the Tour with my team, which is the same team pretty much as last year.” LunaJets, a private jet brokerage based in Geneva, already supported Richard on the RC44 circuit. “When I asked them if they wanted to go on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, they immediately said yes, so they are very excited to be on the circuit with us. We hope we can repay their faith in us. They are very sensitive to the fact that it's a World Championship and we are a very high level team and we are fighting for the victory, for the title. They like this very much.” Richard has a very diverse background in racing, with world championship wins as a tactician in keelboats like the Mumm 30 and fast multihulls the ORMA 60 offshore trimarans. He has won the offshore challenge, the Tour de France a la Voile, four times, but in the past decade he has increasingly focused on match racing. Victory at the European Match Racing Championship in 2004 showed what he could do, and since then he has finished runner-up in the Tour in 2007. He has been a world force in match racing ever since. Richard attributes his success to having raced with a core of friends for a very long time. “I started match racing with Greg, my tactician, more than 15 years ago, so it's really been a while. Then Thierry and Olivier have been with me for eight or nine years. Francois Verdier, the bowman, started with me two years ago and Pascal Rambeau, the same.” While he’s competing in a combative part of the sport, Richard maintains a placid demeanour. “I am not sure I am very aggressive, definitely some are more so, like Bjorn Hansen; even the young guys, Robertson, Swinton, they like to be aggressive. It is not in my nature to be so aggressive. I try to stay smooth on the course to keep the boat fast and we also have good skills in terms of tactics on board with Greg as tactician. It's difficult to say just one good point about the team, we have a lot of skills and I think we are pretty strong in all parts of the game.” Aged 38, he is one of the older skippers on the Tour, but with many good years remaining, and with as much enthusiasm for the sport as ever, he says. “Obviously you haven't got the same spirit when you are 20 as when you are 38. When you are 20 you are starting out, and you are probably a bit fresher and looking at racing with, I wouldn't say more enthusiasm, but you discover everything for the first time. When you get a bit more experienced you know how it works, it's a bit different. You can bet on your experience to beat the others - and that's what we are trying to do.” But is there a danger of relying on experience too much, of not trying new ideas any more? “Not really, because sailing is a game in which you always try to improve every day. Even if I started match racing 15 years ago, I am always trying to improve and thinking about the moves, the start, the trimming etc. You are never satisfied with your level. It's about trying to improve all the time. Experience is a good asset, but you have to always be looking for new tricks.”http://online.casinocity.com evakuator-servis.com http://europosud.uawww.evakuator-servis.comhttp://goodportal.com.ua/

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    London, UK (9th Oct 2014): The German National Match Racing Championship kicks off today at the Constance Yacht Club, Langenargen Germany. Nine of Germany’s best match racing teams will go head to head in the hope of gaining an invite to next year’s Alpari World Match Racing Tour Championship event, Match Race Germany. The German National Match Race Championships will be sailed in Blu26 boats with a 4 person crew on picturesque Lake Constance in Germany. Felix Oehmes, who is one of the best ranked sailors in Germany, has his eyes on winning this year’s event. Oehmes of Hamburg Match Race Team who sailed alongside Carsten Kemmling at Match Race Germany this year, has gained much match racing experience against top sailors from the Alpari Tour and will have a few tricks up his sleeves in the competition. However, more experienced match racers Lars Hueckstedt of Heizkörper Sailing Team and Adrian Maier-Ring, helmsman for Innotio Match Race Team will be among the other contenders looking for the win this weekend. The winner of Qualifying will proceed straight to the Semi Finals. The next 6 teams will compete in Quarter Final knockouts before advancing to Semi Finals and Finals which are scheduled for Saturday 11 October. German National Match Race Championships Felix Oehme-NRV Match Race TeamLars Hueckstaedt-Heizkörper Sailing TeamAdrian Maier-Ring-Innotio Match Race Team IFlorian Haufe-Haufe Racing TeamJens Hartwig-Hartwig Match TeamChi Trung Huynh-ASV Matchrace Team Mathias Rebholz-Team Up!Felix Schrimper-Innotio Match Race Team II Tino Ellegast-Team Ellegast

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    London, UK (20th June 2014): The Batavia Sailing Center today selected the Batavia Regatta, which will run over 23 - 24 August 2014 at the Bataviahaven of Lelystad, Holland, as the official Qualifying event for the Dutch Match Cup 2014. The Batavia Sailing Center is the organiser of the Dutch Match Cup the recently announced Stage of the Alpari World Match Racing Tour. For teams wishing to race in the Dutch Match Cup two Qualification places are available. Both the winner and the runner up of the Batavia Regatta will receive an invite to the Dutch Match Cup which will be held between 24-28 September this year. The Dutch Match Cup and the Batavia Regatta will be sailed in MaxFun 25 boats with the race area directly in front of the port of Bataviahaven, very close to the shore, offering fantastic opportunities for spectators to enjoy the action. The organization of the Dutch Match Cup has two further Wild Card invites which will be decided upon later in the year. Batavia Regatta The Batavia Regatta will be an ISAF Grade 3 match racing event. Further information about invites to the Batavia Regatta and the NoRcan be found at www.dutchmatchcup.nl/qualifier/jobtalk.jp http://www.budmag.ua http://www.progressive.uawww.dxtranse.com.ua/europosud.ua/

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FEATURED SKIPPER

Skipper - US Virgin Islands

At 25, Taylor is one of the brightest stars to recently come out of the St. Thomas YC, US Virgin Islands.  Taylor and his USone team have made a presence on not only the US Match Race Circuit, but international match race events around the world. As the current sailing director at Chicago Match Race Center and ranked 1st in the open ISAF rankings, he has made a presence on the WMRT circu...

STRONG TRADITIONS

Old traditions but humble minds

It has taken many years for competitive sailing to capture the public imagination and it has taken a return to basic principles to make it happen. Right at the beginning of yacht racing, in the 17th century, races took place between two boats going down the river to the sea and back, and crowds lined the sides of the river to watch it happening. It was easy to understand, because the first one home won, it was exciting and it was a marvellous spectacle.

Over the years, as is so often the way with sport, the experts refined the rules, introduced handicaps and developed a language that ensured that only a rarefied breed of sailor – usually a member of an exclusive club – would understand what was going on and very often even he would not. The wider audience didn’

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